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Drifterman

DRIFTERMAN.COM
May the wind always be at your back and the sun upon your face... And may the wings of destiny carry you aloft to dance with the stars...
 
                                                  Boston George
 

OperationGameOver.com

The American flag is a treasured symbol of the USA, and there are rules for handling, displaying and disposing of flags. The United States Code says the flag should only be flown upside down to signal "dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.

AMERICA THE EMPIRE

America's Prison Industrial Complex

“When the United States incarcerated at a rate of 7 times that of any other developed nation, it should be a red flag warning citizens that we have lost our way on the road to freedom.
 
”Beth Curtis, MSW of Zanesville, OH

Who Profits ??

Jail Time = More Money For Everyone

www.g4s.com/

International Gem Tower


Published on May 22, 2015
 
G4S Technology, Secure Solutions and International Logistics combine to provide a successful and comprehensive security envelope. G4S Technology designed, installed, and engineered access control systems. G4S Secure Solutions provides high quality security officers and International Logistics protects incoming and outgoing valuables.

G4S -- Manpower Technology Innovation -- G4S Security

PMC - Private Military Contractors - POWERFUL Mercenary ARMIES - G4S 625,000 Employees

'Mercenaries do better job than US Army' - Blackwater founder

The Prison-Industrial Complex - The Atlantic
Prison–industrial complex - Wikipedia
America's Private Prisons Are Back
in Business - Bloomberg
Jailing Americans for Profit: The Rise of the Prison Industrial Complex
Shocking Facts About America's For-Profit Prison Industry -...
Top Private Prison Operators Geo,
Corrections Corp Of America
How the prison-industrial complex is
corrupting American elections
The Prison Industry in the United States: Big Business or a New...
Prison Stocks Soar Under Trump As Jeff Sessions Okays Private Jails

Federal Prison Population Expected to Grow Under Trump

Trump Team Can't Wait To Fill More
Private Prisons With Minorities

Trump Team Can't Wait To Fill More
Private Prisons With Minorities

NOW on PBS 419 Prisons for Profit i

Federal Prison Population Expected to Grow Under Trump

Private Prisons

Prisons for Profit: 18 Months in the Life of the Nation's First Prison Sold for Profit

Corrupt Judge Sentenced To 28 Years In Prison For Selling Kids To Private Prisons

Care and Justice Services
 
Care and justice services is part of secure solutions and offers highly specialised services to central and local governments and government agencies and authorities
 
Juvenile and adult custody Management of all aspects of a facility and those held within the facility – similar centres are also used for the detention of asylum applicants  

Prisoner escorting Transportation of prisoners and asylum applicants between courts, police stations and custody and asylum centres

Asylum services Management of housing provision and other services for asylum applicants
Electronic monitoring Electronic tagging and monitoring of offenders at home or in the community

Police services Back office support functions for police forces, support for front line policing including the provision of custody suite services and forensic medical services
 
Market and Strategy

Care and justice delivers more than 10% of secure solutions revenue. While the care and justice services market is concentrated primarily in the UK, US, Australia and New Zealand, we see a number of countries exploring the possibility of outsourcing these services to the private sector.
 
The market structure is typically consolidated on the supply side with a small number of providers. Larger companies are usually better equipped to deliver such highly specialised services.

Bob Riley, 62, gentle Deadhead
serving a life sentence for LSD

Bob Riley, a wandering-wondering Deadhead, enjoying a sunny day in
New York’s Central Park, in 1990, after several Grateful Dead shows.

Bob was arrested in 1992 for mailing LSD and mushrooms to a fellow Deadhead in Iowa. He was sentenced to life without parole in 1993.
Prosecutors falsely labeled Bob as a career criminal because he’d used, shared and sold drugs over the years. He’d been arrested three times over 15 years for a puny amount of drugs.
His first arrest? Selling a joint on a San Diego beach. In all, his three arrests were for one-fourth of an ounce of pot, 3 grams of hash and $25 worth of amphetamines.

Bob Riley -- Deadhead serving life for LSD

Bob's Story

Antonio Bascaró, 80,
the nation’s longest serving marijuana prisoner

With more than half the United States legalizing marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes, it is difficult to imagine that there are still people all over the country serving hard time over pot possession. However, throughout the course of the past year, we have learned about an unfortunate legion of pot prisoners, like Jeff Mizanskey, who is currently serving a life sentence with no possibility of parole for a three-strike conviction over possession of marijuana.
 
Antonio Bascaró is soon to become yet another infamous prisoner/casualty of the drug war. He has been incarcerated since the Reagan administration for a marijuana-related offense, which has earned him the unfortunate title of “The Nation’s Longest Serving Marijuana Prisoner.”
 
For the past 35 years, Bascaró, a former Cuban naval pilot during the Bay of Pigs invasion, has been sitting in a federal prison for his non-violent role in a 1970’s pot smuggling operation. Bascaró, now 80 years old, was sentenced in 1980 to several decades behind bars for working aboard a fishing boat used by Cuban nationals to smuggle cannabis between Colombia to Florida. This was Bascaró’s first and only offense.
 
Even though Bascaró holds the record for the most time served for a marijuana crime in the United States, his story has gone largely unpublicized since 1982. The sad, but true, fact of the matter is not even organizations that lobby for the release of non-violent pot offenders have heard of Bascaró or the details surrounding his case. He is truly “Marijuana’s forgotten man,” according to a recent article in The Clemency Report.
 
Unfortunately, 35 years ago, not only did Bascaró lose his life to the harsh penalties associated with marijuana in this country, but his three children also lost their father. His daughter, Aicha Bascaró, was only 12 years old when Bascaró was given the sentence for his one-and-only marijuana offense, leaving the family no choice but to maintain a relationship through occasional visits to a federal penitentiary in Miami.
“My father has paid with his life (and ours) for that one marijuana offense,” said Aicha, who is now the vice president of a company in Atlanta. “I think that the time he has served is more than enough punishment."
 
The elderly man, who is now a grandfather, spends the majority of his days confined to a wheelchair, where he reads newspapers and listens to the news from his cell. He is scheduled for release in the summer of 2019, but in poor health, his daughter worries he might die in prison if clemency is not granted.
 
Unfortunately, because Bascaró’s case happened so many years ago, he does not qualify for the Bureau of Prisons “compassionate release” program, which allows prisoners who are at least 65 years old that have served 50 percent of their sentence the possibility for an early release. Essentially, Bascaró is forced to serve out the remainder of his prison term behind bars because he is not eligible for any of the sentencing reform implemented by the Obama administration over the past few years.
 
Nevertheless, Bascaró’s family is fighting for his release. They launched a petition several weeks ago in hopes that President Obama will take notice and grant their father the compassion he deserves.
 
At the time this article was published, the petition still needed over 90,000 signatures in order to get the issue in front of the president.
Antonio's Story

Who Benefits When A Private Prison
Comes To Town?

This Is How Private Prison Companies Make Millions Even When Crime Rates Fall

We are living in boom times for the private prison industry. The Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the nation's largest owner of private prisons, has seen its revenue climb by more than 500 percent in the last two decades. And CCA wants to get much, much bigger: Last year, the company made an offer to 48 governors to buy and operate their state-funded prisons. But what made CCA's pitch to those governors so audacious and shocking was that it included a so-called occupancy requirement, a clause demanding the state keep those newly privatized prisons at least 90 percent full at all times, regardless of whether crime was rising or falling.

Top Private Prison Companies


1. Corrections Corporation of America (CCA)
2010 revenue: $1.7 billion
Prisoner capacity: 90,037
Year founded: 1983
Headquarters: Nashville, Tenn.
Head: Damon Hininger (president and CEO)
Executive compensation: $3,266,387 compensation package for Hininger in 2010 (according to Morningstar)

2. The GEO Group
2010 revenue: $1.2 billion
Prisoner capacity: 81,000
Year founded: 1984 (founded as Wackenhut Corrections Corp.)
Headquarters: Boca Raton, Fla. Head: George Zoley (chairman, CEO, founder)
Executive compensation: $3,484,807 compensation package for Zoley in 2010 (according to Morningstar)

Sources: CCA: 2010 Annual Letter to Shareholders; A Quarter Century of Service to America; About CCA; Morningstar, Corrections Corporation of America, Key Executive Compensation. GEO Group: 2010 Annual Report; 2010 Letter to Shareholders; Morningstar, The GEO Group, Inc., Key Executive Compensation.

 
Private Prison's
The Real Story
The Prison Crisis
 
THE NUMBERS:
 
With only 5% of the world’s population, the U.S. has 25% of the world’s prison population – that makes us the world’s largest jailer.

Since 1970, our prison population has risen 700%.
One in 99 adults are living behind bars in the U.S. This marks the highest rate of imprisonment in American history.

One in 31 adults are under some form of correctional control, counting prison, jail, parole and probation populations.

The Prison Crisis
U.S. Prison Population Seeing “Unprecedented Increase”